MusicInk Transforms Drawings Into Playable Instruments

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What if you could transform a sketch of your favorite musical instrument into something that actually plays music? Welcome to MusicInk, an innovative new educational toy invented to teach children about the properties of sound in a fun and interactive way.

The brainchild of Gilda Negrini and Riccardo Vendramin from Milan's Polytechnic School, MusicInk requires users to draw one of four instruments - guitar with strings, trumpet, drum or piano keys, using the stencils and the paint that are provided. The magic as you may have guessed lies in the latter, which is not just any paint, but a unique invention called Bare Paint, that looks and acts just like any other colorant but becomes conductive, as soon as it dries.

The drawings are then connected to an Arduino-driven electronic circuit board and an MPR121 Sparkfun Controller that transform the paper instruments into capacitive proximity sensors that are capable of reacting to gestures (similar to how the iPhone reacts to taps and swipes).

Then comes the fun part. When user 'plays' the instrument by either tapping on the drum or pushing down the valve of the trumpet or even strumming the guitar, the signal is received by the sensors and transmitted to a Smartphone app via Bluetooth. The app deciphers the signal and projects the music - and not just any random notes either, but ones that would emit from the real instrument if it were being played by the musicians of the London Philharmonic Orchestra. The best part is that the instruments do not have to be played one at a time - As many as twelve kids can play different instruments simultaneously, and create their own orchestra.

However, before you dash out looking for this magical musical instrument making kit, bear in mind that it is still only a prototype and though it may appear perfect to us, the creators are not yet satisfied. They are still tinkering with the design to make MusicInk even more intuitive, customizable and hopefully even wireless, before bringing it to market.

Also, though the first application of the toy is intended for younger children to experiment and play with their drawings, MusicInk has a more complex but equally magical toy in store for older students - One that will use different patterns to teach them about the various nuances of sounds like pitch, intensity, timbre, and duration.

Resources: Wired.com,bareconductive.com,musicink.com

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Vocabulary List
colorantconductivecustomizabledeciphersdurationinnovativeintensityinteractiveintuitivenuancespitchproximityrandomsensorssimultaneouslytimbrewireless
223 Comments
  • ravenbeast
    ravenbeastMonday, May 13, 2019 at 9:24 am
    interesting
    • newatidenymoha
      newatidenymohaMonday, November 12, 2018 at 5:03 pm
      Pencil is actually conductive, if you draw it dark enough.
      • grapefruit
        grapefruitTuesday, November 14, 2017 at 4:37 am
        How does it even work?Please reply and follow me if you know
        • insert_name
          insert_nameTuesday, November 28, 2017 at 8:18 am
          Electric wave of magnitism.
          • devila
            devilaTuesday, November 14, 2017 at 11:23 am
            I think it's because of the magnetism in the ink, or the type of wires they use and it connects to some sort of substance (which I don't know for sure what it is) and it makes musical vibrations!
          • CollinTuesday, October 31, 2017 at 8:25 am
            Wow that is revolutionary. Way to go. I think that is the coolest invention ever!
            • AnthonyTuesday, November 15, 2016 at 12:23 pm
              wow
              • popularmmosfanTuesday, November 15, 2016 at 8:44 am
                i want it so much
                • YoFriday, January 22, 2016 at 9:14 am
                  Wow that is awsome!
                  • myahamster08
                    myahamster08Wednesday, November 11, 2015 at 6:06 pm
                    I want one!
                    • axecop
                      axecopThursday, October 29, 2015 at 12:26 pm
                      very fascinating I don't have any idea how this was done. This is really cool!
                      • enchanted7
                        enchanted7Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 1:34 am
                        How is this even possible?! It might as well be the coolest device on earth! Plus, it needs like no electricity!