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Plant-Like Ediacarans Were Possibly One Of The Earliest Animals On Earth

Plant-Like Ediacarans Were Possibly One Of The Earliest Animals On Earth

The “Ediacaran biota,” a common name given to a large group of over 200 types of fossils that have been found across the world, have baffled scientists for decades. Over the years, researchers have debated whether the strange-looking organisms were fungi, algae, or just ancient animals that had failed to evolve. Now, some experts believe they have proof that the mysterious creatures were indeed animals, probably one of the first ones on Earth.

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Massive Barrel Jellyfish Caught On Camera Off English Coast

Massive Barrel Jellyfish Caught On Camera Off English Coast

BBC Earth host Lizzie Daly and underwater photographer Dan Abbott released several videos of exciting encounters with marine animals off the English coast from July 7 to July 13, 2019. The pair swam alongside gray seals off the coast of Northumberland, minke whales off the northwest coast of Scotland, and seabirds near Wales. However, the highlight came on the final day of the tour, when the underwater adventurers stumbled upon a massive barrel jellyfish off the coast of Falmouth, Cornwall. The sighting of the mesmerizing animal was a fitting way to end Daly's "Wild Ocean Week" campaign to raise ocean awareness and funds for the UK's Marine Conservation Society.

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Tiny Dracula Ants Set Record For The Fastest-Known Animal Movement

Tiny Dracula Ants Set Record For The Fastest-Known Animal Movement

Pesky as they may be, ants are truly incredible insects. The tiny creatures can survive floods by joining together to morph into living rafts, predict earthquakes, lift up to 20 times their body weight, and even select the best tool to complete a job efficiently. Now, it appears that the elusive Dracula ant (Mystrium camillae) can snap its jaws shut at a mind-boggling speed of 90 meters per second (more than 200 miles per hour) – the fastest-known animal movement on record.

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Perfectly Preserved Ice Age Animals Still Have Skin, Muscle, and Hair

Perfectly Preserved Ice Age Animals Still Have Skin, Muscle, and Hair

The Klondike region in Canada’s Yukon territory, which is famous for its gold mines, was once home to a large variety of animals. They included the long-extinct saber-toothed cats and woolly mammoths, as well as creatures like gray wolves, whose descendants still roam the Arctic territories. Hence, it is not uncommon for miners to stumble upon fossilized remains of the Ice Age inhabitants while unearthing the precious metal. However, the mummified remains of a caribou calf and wolf pup, unveiled in Dawson City, Yukon on September 13, 2018, are among the oldest-known specimens found with perfectly preserved skin, muscle, and hair. The wolf pup is also the only one of its kind discovered to date.

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Meet "Ingentia Prima," The World's Earliest-Known Giant Dinosaur!

Meet "Ingentia Prima," The World's Earliest-Known Giant Dinosaur!

Researchers have always maintained that Triassic dinosaurs were small, chicken-sized critters, and that it was not until the Jurassic period — about 180-million years ago — that massive herbivorous sauropods, like the Diplodocus and Brachiosaurus, emerged. However, the discovery of a new dinosaur species in Argentina suggests that the animals achieved gigantism during the late Triassic period, about 30 million years earlier than previously believed.

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Honeybees Join The Elite Group Of Animals That Understand The Concept Of Zero

Honeybees Join The Elite Group Of Animals That Understand The Concept Of Zero

Just a few decades ago, humans were the only species believed to be smart enough to grasp the concept of zero — the idea that nothing can be counted as something. While a select group of animals including dolphins, primates, and a few birds have since been added to the list, experts have always maintained that only “intelligent” species are capable of processing the difficult concept. Now, researchers from Melbourne’s RMIT University in Melbourne and France’s Université de Toulouse, assert that honeybees, which like all insects are considered to be at the low end of the cognitive spectrum, also understand the abstract mathematical notion of nothing.

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Brainless Jellyfish Could Help Reveal Why We Sleep

Brainless Jellyfish Could Help Reveal Why We Sleep

The reason animals “waste” so much time sleeping has always been somewhat of a mystery to scientists. The popular belief is that resting rids brain cells of toxins, helps consolidate fresh memories and prepares the mind for a new day of learning. However, a new study by a team of research students at the California Institute of Technology has unveiled it’s not just creatures with brains that snooze - even the brainless jellyfish need their zzz’s!

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